Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Canada’

Alcoholism

Alcoholism is a mental obsession that causes a physical compulsion to drink.  A mental compulsion is a thought processwhich you have no control over.The vast majority of problem drinkers are people with families and jobs.  They may be dependent drinkers, binge drinkers or people who just drink too much on a regular basis.

It is estimated that for every problem drinker there are 3 or 4 other people affected directly and many more indirectly.  Those problems affect the family, relationships, routines and damage the quality of individual life experiences and opportunities.

The cost of alcoholism is outrageous.  A recent study estimates that the annual economic costs of alcohol and other drug abuse in Canada may be as high as $24.6 billion.

Alcoholism is a progressive disease, it starts with the mental compulsion that is stopped by having a drink and soon one is not enough, then maybe four is not enough to stop the compulsion and it continues until the individual can only stop the compulsion by passing out.

The progression of the disease is so subtle and has  usually taken place over an extended period of time that even the alcoholic themselves have failed to notice when alcohol took over their lives.

For those that have realized that alcohol is a problem there is help but for those that haven’t realized sometimes intervention is the only way.

Advertisements

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) – “What is it? And Does It Affect You?”

DAVID JAMES & ASSOCIATES
http://www.davidjamesandassociates.com
January, 2011

Counselling, Counsellor, Niagara Region, St. Catharines, Therapist, Thorold, Welland, Niagara Falls, Beamsville, Lincoln, Grimsby, Stoney Creek, Port Colborne, Psychotherapy, Psychologist, addictions, chronic pain, hypno therapy, marriage, divorce

Visit our Website for more information and locations

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
“What is it? And Does It Affect You?”

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is when a person suffers clinical depressions only during the autumn and winter seasons, in the spring and summer they feel well and “normal”.

Symptoms of SAD:

-Extreme fatigue and lack of energy
-Increased need for sleep; sleeping more than usual
-Carbohydrate craving and increased appetite
-Weight gain

If you think that you may have SAD you should visit your family doctor to be assessed because some physical problems can show up as depression.

How common is SAD?

Researchers believe that SAD results from the shorter day length in winter. SAD seems to be more common in northern countries because the winter day is shorter as you go north. Up to 2 million people in Canada may have difficulties in the winter months due to significant clinical depression.

What treatments are available for SAD?

Many patient with SAD benefit from exposure to bright, artificial light, called light therapy or photo therapy. As little as 30 minutes per day of sitting under a light box results in significant improvement in 60% to 80% of SAD patients. People with certain medical conditions or taking certain medications should avoid light therapy. Other treatments for depression, such as antidepressants and counselling may also help. If you suffer with milder symptoms of the “winter blahs” it might be beneficial to spend more time outdoors and exercise more in the winter.

Why does light therapy work?

Nobody know for sure why light therapy works, there are a few theories. One theory is that people with SAD have a disturbance in the “biological clock” in the brain that regulates hormones, sleep patterns and mood. This clock runs slow due to the diminished light in the winter and the light therapy helps to trick the clock. Another theory is that SAD patients have reduced retinal light sensitivity in the winter that is corrected with light therapy. A final theory is that the shorter periods of light in the winter cause less brain chemical function, particularly the production of serotonin and dopamine. Light therapy or anti-depression medication corrects this imbalance.

%d bloggers like this: